A Slow Revolt

And then came the day when some of us understood that all we had known about time was wrong. It’s not precise, it’s not objective, it’s not limited. It’s not about being first, outrunning others, or even getting somewhere faster.

This was the day we would just drop out and start to live life at our own pace. Because our own pace was the only thing that mattered: Some of us would go faster, speak faster, think faster; others would go slower, speak slower, think slower.

We noticed that time and speed are much more personal than we had ever thought: It doesn’t matter which measurable speed you attain, but how you feel about it personally. If you run a marathon in 2.5 hours, then it’s 2.5. If it is eight hours, then it’s eight. Even if you take the shuttle bus just to attend the after-party, people will cheer.1

The machine didn’t like to see these thoughts. Because big systems don’t seem to work well when everybody moves at their own pace. Just think of highway traffic.

But while some of the people around us gave in and lost their pace of life, we didn’t.

We didn’t let them distract us.

We just opted for our own speed, and, in that sense, we became anarchists. Not of the kind that throws bombs and burns cars. But of the kind that takes responsibility for their own lives and their own speed and their own time, and of the kind that create their own rules that serve them while not harming others.

This is the nature of friendly anarchism, and it’s the essence of living life at tempo giusto. In other news, it looks as if light just became slow. Astounding, and yet another proof.

  1. I did that in Berlin, recently. []

Comments 6

  1. Steve Marquez September 23, 2011

    Love this Fabian – thanks. I am having good days and bad days with this approach to life at the moment. Some days I’m really on the money, doing things in my own time, feeling relaxed and calm. And then, there are the days when all that goes to shit and time, and pressure, and busyness have me running round in circles. I guess it’s all about progress rather than perfection. Steve

    • Fabian September 25, 2011

      Steve, it’s always easy to “fall off the wagon”, sure. The good thing is that it’s just as easy to et on it again later… so yes, progress rather than perfection! :)

  2. Ryan October 2, 2011

    A slow revolt… I like that phrase, because that is what it is, isn’t it? There are a lot of things calling themselves revolutions these days, but there is perhaps the most powerful one for the individual that understands this:

    “We just opted for our own speed, and, in that sense, we became anarchists. Not of the kind that throws bombs and burns cars. But of the kind that takes responsibility for their own lives and their own speed and their own time, and of the kind that create their own rules that serve them while not harming others.”

    Well said, Fabian. Cheers.

  3. Jonathan Ziemba October 4, 2011

    In the common living race, wins are defined by time, your time not time, your reality not reality. Once we hold time, really hold it up and see it, then time becomes totally different.

    Time becomes the controller, the conditioner, our ball and chain. Time puts yesterday and tomorrow in the capacity of now, clouding the truth, the now.

    But once we see time as not time, our reality bends. We break the chains of time and free ourselves of our time controller.

    Viva the time anarchists.

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